Tag Archive: Economy



Under the Influence | Boston Review
Democracy requires that all citizens—rich and poor alike—have influence over the policies their government adopts. Of course, it would be unreasonable to expect everyone to have equal sway. Citizens differ not only in economic resources but also in time, knowledge, and interest in social and political affairs. Still, when influence becomes too skewed toward the affluent, when political power becomes too concentrated in the hands of a few, democracy itself is threatened.~Martin Gilens

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On Medicaid expansion, Jindal should embrace his own plan

Article: On expanding Medicaid, however, Jindal has reversed course. He now opposes extending coverage to Louisiana’s working poor under provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It’s too expensive, he says.
Five years ago, Jindal was dying to pay 30 percent of the cost to expand Medicaid. What would be Louisiana’s share of expanding Medicaid under the ACA? Nothing for the first three years; afterwards, 10 percent.
In 2008, Jindal’s health secretary spoke about the urgency of expanding Medicaid and of preserving beneficiaries’ “dignity.” Jindal’s administration has now dropped such talk. “Soon there will be more people riding in the cart than people pulling the cart,” Jindal complained last April.
In 2008, these individuals had “dignity.” Today, they’re just bums asking for a free ride.
What’s changed?


A pope’s pointed message

“Some people continue to defend trickle-down theories, which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice and inclusiveness in the world. This opinion, which has never b…een confirmed by the facts, expresses a crude and naive trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power and in the sacralized workings of the prevailing economic system. Meanwhile, the excluded are still waiting.” “To sustain a lifestyle which excludes others, or to sustain enthusiasm for that selfish ideal, a globalization of indifference has developed,” Francis wrote. “Almost without being aware of it, we end up being incapable of feeling compassion at the outcry of the poor, weeping for other people’s pain, and feeling a need to help them, as though all this were someone else’s responsibility and not our own. The culture of prosperity deadens us; we are thrilled if the market offers us something new to purchase; and in the meantime all those lives stunted for lack of opportunity seem a mere spectacle; they fail to move us.” “The private ownership of goods is justified by the need to protect and increase them, so that they can better serve the common good; for this reason, solidarity must be lived as the decision to restore to the poor what belongs to them.” ~ Pope Francis
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